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In the run-up to the 2016 U.S. presidential elections, Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton received a serious blow from a series of leaks coming from the email account of her campaign chairman John Podesta. Hackers were able to access the contents of Podesta’s account by staging a successful phishing attack and stealing his credentials.pass Podesta is

Multifactor Authentication Challenges and Benefits

Hackers count on people being lazy with their passwords. It’s a problem with organizations of every size and type, including industry giants like Google. People who find it too much of a hassle to toss an aluminum can into the recycling bin right next to the trash bin have no problem recycling the same password

Differences Between 2FA and MFA

The days of trusting passwords alone—single-factor authentication—are nearly over. Today, IT security teams responsible for user identity and access management are turning to more secure options: multi-factor authentication (MFA) and two-factor authentication (2FA). Is MFA more secure than 2FA? Are the terms interchangeable? If not, what’s the difference between the two? Keep reading to get

How and why to use two factor authentication

You might not realize it, but you regularly use two-factor authentication. When you swipe your debit card and are asked to enter your PIN code or write a check and are asked to show your driver’s license? Each is a form of two-factor authentication. The first example requires you to possess your card and know

what is multifactor authentication in simple explanation

Multifactor authentication (MFA) is a security system that requires more than one method of authentication from independent categories of credentials to verify the user’s identity for a login or other transaction. Multifactor authentication combines two or more independent credentials: what the user knows (password), what the user has (security token) and what the user is

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